What happens when a person quits smoking

The benefits start just minutes after quitting. If you have been smoking for a while, you might wonder if quitting is even worth it. You wonder, “The damage is done, so does it really make a difference?”. Absolutely.

Your body has an amazing ability to heal itself, and it happens quicker than you think — less than half an hour after you put out that last cigarette. Keep in mind, you’re more likely to succeed if you have a plan to handle those cravings, especially in the first few weeks. The process of quitting requires determination and patience as it will affect you both physically and mentally, so be prepared for its withdrawal period.

20 Minutes

Your body is already getting better. After 20 minutes, your pulse and blood pressure start to drop back to normal. And your hands and feet warm up to their usual temperature.

8 Hours

By the end of a work day, you have half the amount of nicotine and carbon monoxide in your blood. Carbon monoxide is a chemical in cigarettes, and it crowds out oxygen in your blood. But as the chemical’s levels drop, your oxygen gets back to normal.

12 Hours

Halfway through your first day, your carbon monoxide level is back to normal. Now your heart does not have to pump so hard to try to get enough oxygen to your body.

 

24 Hours

If you smoke a pack a day, you’re twice as likely to have a heart attack as a nonsmoker. But go one full day without a cigarette, and you’ve lowered your chances. That is huge.

48 Hours

In 2 days, your senses of taste and smell get sharper as your nerve endings start to heal. Your lungs kick out mucus and other gunk left from cigarettes. And you don’t have any more nicotine in your body.

3 Days

By the end of day 3, you breathe easier and have more energy. Your lungs start to recover and will keep getting better.

2 Weeks – 3 Months

During this time, you can do more because your lungs are stronger and clearer, and your blood flow has improved. You can exercise without getting as winded. And your risk of a heart attack goes down even more.

3-9 Months

At this point, you can take deeper, clearer breaths. Instead of hacking, you cough in a helpful way that actually clears things out. That helps you get fewer colds and other illnesses. You will also have more energy.

1 Year

At the end of year 1, treat yourself. You have reached a milestone. And your risk of heart disease is now half of what it was a year ago.

5 Years

Your chances of a stroke and cervical cancer are now the same as a nonsmoker. And compared to when you first quit, you are half as likely to get cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, or bladder.

10 Years

Compared to someone who still smokes, you are now half as likely to die from lung cancer and the chances you will get cancer of the larynx (voice box) and pancreas both drop.

15 Years

Finally, after 15 years of not smoking, the chances that you will get heart disease are the same as if you never smoked. Your body has done a ton of recovery and healing.

When you start out, it seems like a long road. But at 15 years, the headaches and discomfort of those first few weeks are a hazy memory. They can seem unbearable at the time, but you can get through it. The rewards are very real and clear.

 

Subscribe

You may want to consider subscribing to my blog for regular updates. If you have any questions, please feel free to email me jay@jayashreeprakash.com

Follow Us

No Comments

Leave a Comment